Thursday, 30 April 2015

Drying Flowers

Drying Flowers


As a florist I often get asked; ''What's the best way to dry flowers?'' I find that lots of people have their own thoughts and ways to do it but I have always found a place that is warm for a large percentage of the day and a place that is dark is the best way to preserve your flowers.


Not all flowers dry well and people usually are looking to dry flowers that are memorable to them. My mum has hung most of our wedding bouquets up around in her conservatory and over the last 6 years they have grown more and more delicate.
Before I became a florist I used to just hang flowers at the end of a curtain poll and leave to dry. That's what I did with my wedding bouquet, but over time it went brown and got so dusty I ended up throwing it out. Luckily my mum had all the bridesmaids'!


Since learning more about it I have found the best way to keep colour is to not dry them in sunlight as that bleaches them. Or to dry them as quickly as possible like on the top of a heater or AGA.
I took some cream roses I had and tied them together and hung them in a cupboard that has hot pipes running through. They dried within the week and have kept the cream colour instead of turning brown.
I find this is the best method.
You need to be careful what flowers you choose to dry: some are too soft and will mould or will dry and just fall apart. I tried to do some tulips and the colours was amazing but as soon as I touched them they crumbled!
I know lots of brides often wonder what to do with their bouquet. As I said, some just hang them and leave them to dry, some take all the petals off, dry them and make a pot-pouri with them and I know some people press them in the pages of books.


Here is a of flowers that I think will dry best, but there are lots of preserving agencies on the internet who say they can preserve most types if you were getting something done professionally.

Larkspur, Stocks, Statice, Rose, Gyp, Delphiniums, Lavender, Peony (pink ones) Eringium, Limonium, Allium, Hydrangea, Cornflowers, Echinops, Nigella and Poppy heads.

I am sure there are many more and you could test ones from your own gardens.

Whatever you do when trying to dry your own flowers, just try and keep them protected and remember, nothing lasts forever so just enjoy them while you can!


Post by Emily
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1 comment

  1. Thanks for sharing your drying advice use similar methods myself.You did an amazing job for your sister's wedding it was majical.Would love to get bride & groom dolls were they from Wilkinson's? Can't find them maybe they were purchased some time ago? I so enjoy your blog & posts kindest regards Meryl

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